Guy Scott 12 things you didn't know about Zambia's Former Interim President

He became the acting president of Zambia after the death of Michael Sata

He became the first white head of state in Africa since Fredrick De Klerk
in 1994.

He served in the Ministry of Finance as a planner.

Scott is ineligible for the forthcoming election because the constitution
of Zambia requires for presidential candidates to be at least
third-generation. The provision was put in place by President Frederick
Chiluba to prevent Kenneth Kaunda – whose father was born in what became
Malawi – from becoming president.

He is a former agriculture minister credited with steering the country out
of a food crisis after a drought in the early 1990s.

Scott won by a landslide against many ‘native’ Zambians in his constituency.

A few of his famous quotes after became VP are:

“It feels rather good, especially as it turns out to be a very popular
appointment, which is flattering. There’s been no hint of any resentment of
a white man being made vice-president.”

“I have long suspected Zambia is moving from a post-colonial to a
cosmopolitan condition,” Scott said. “People’s minds are changing. They are
no longer sitting back and dwelling on what was wrong about a colonialism.
There’s a Caribbeanisation, there’s a range of colours – so what?”

Asked if he could imagine a white vice-president in neighbouring Zimbabwe,
which became independent in 1980, he replied: “We’ve been independent since
1964so maybe we’re a little ahead in the forgive-and-forget game. I don’t
think racism has much mileage in Zimbabwe. Maybe it’s a lesson that will
push a few others in Africa.”

“People are nostalgic, not for exploitation and division, but for the
standards of colonial times. When you went to the hospital there was
medicine, when you went to schools there were books, when you went to the
shops there were goods to buy.”There is a sense of these as being ‘white
man’s standards’. Whether rightly or not rightly is another matter.”

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